Marshmallow reviews Percy Jackson’s Greek Heroes by Rick Riordan

Last week Marshmallow described Rick Riordan’s introductory book on Greek gods: Percy Jackson’s Greek Gods. This week she wanted to talk about a related book, again by Rick Riordan: Percy Jackson’s Greek Heroes. Sprinkles decided to join her and will be asking questions.

Marshmallow reviews Percy Jackson’s Greek Heroes by Rick Riordan.
Marshmallow reviews Percy Jackson’s Greek Heroes by Rick Riordan.

Sprinkles: So this week we will be talking about Rick Riordan’s book about Greek heroes. This is another 500-page book and you have been reading it over and over again.

Marshmallow: Yes, I think it is a pretty good book.

S: So what is this book about really?

M: It’s about Greek heroes like Hercules and Perseus and Theseus. And Perseus is apparently who Percy Jackson was named after.

S: I think we had learned that in one of the Percy Jackson and the Olympians books. It was at least in one of the movies.

M: Oh yes, I remember that scene.

S: So just like in his Greek gods book, in this one, too Percy Jackson is narrating and telling us stories about these famous heroes of ancient Greek mythology.

M: Yes.

Marshmallow is reading Percy Jackson’s Greek Heroes by Rick Riordan.
Marshmallow is reading Percy Jackson’s Greek Heroes by Rick Riordan.

S: I know you knew about some of the Greek gods before. But did you know about any of the heroes in this book before reading it?

M: Yes, I knew a little bit about Theseus and Perseus, and Atalanta, and Orpheus, and Hercules.

S: Oh, I didn’t know you knew that much about all these characters. Then did you learn anything new when reading this book?

M: Yes. I didn’t know about Otrera who started the Amazons. It is kind of a sad story really. And most of them are kind of sad stories anyways. But the chapter names are really funny.

S: Tell me some of your favorites then.

M: There is one called “Phaethon Fails Driver’s Ed”. And there is “Otrera Invents the Amazons (with Free Two-Day Shipping!)”. I also like “Atalanta vs. Three Pieces of Fruit: The Ultimate Death Match”.

S: I get the point. It seems like Rick Riordan always finds amusing chapter titles.

M: Yes, in his other books, the chapter titles are funny, too.

Marshmallow is looking at the colorful insert in Percy Jackson’s Greek Heroes by Rick Riordan. The first page displays artwork by John Rocco of Perseus defeating a monster.
Marshmallow is looking at the colorful insert in Percy Jackson’s Greek Heroes by Rick Riordan. The first page displays artwork by John Rocco of Perseus defeating a monster.

S: There is once again an artwork insert in this book, right?

M: Yes. There are eight full-page illustrations by John Rocco in full color, in the middle of the book.

S: Is there a picture for each chapter?

M: No, there are more than eight chapters. Okay, let me count them. Twelve chapters.

S: I’m guessing folks who enjoyed other Percy Jackson books will like this book, too, right?

M: Yes. But maybe it might be better for older readers (9 and up). There are some words that some parents might not approve. But actually Percy Jackson always uses that kind of language. He does not always use bad words, but sometimes a few less savory words slip in.

S: Then again maybe this is almost always the case for middle-grade books. You told me before that the FunJungle books also have somewhat similar language.

M: That may be true.

S: Okay Marshmallow, I am guessing this is a good time to wrap up this review. Do you want to rate this book?

M: Yes! I rate it 95%.

Marshmallow rates Percy Jackson’s Greek Heroes by Rick Riordan 95%.
Marshmallow rates Percy Jackson’s Greek Heroes by Rick Riordan 95%.

3 thoughts on “Marshmallow reviews Percy Jackson’s Greek Heroes by Rick Riordan”

  1. Did Marshmallow know that Otrera is considered the mythological founder of the Temple of Artemis in Ephesus? This Temple was closely connected with Amazons, which in modern times gave rise to Wonder Woman.

    The term “hero” is perhaps overused today, but these guys were the originals. The mythology of ancient Greece was filled with great heroes who slew monsters, battled whole armies, and loved (and lost) beautiful women. Their stories often reveal them to be imperfect characters …, but their names live on.

    Of all the heroes, Achilles was perhaps my favorite. As an infant Achilles’ mother dipped him into the River Styx, which made him invulnerable everywhere but the heel by which she held him, maybe she should have dipped him in the river while holding him by the hair. Achilles was a great hero in the Trojan War. But in the end, Paris, son of the Trojan king, fatally wounded Achilles in the heel. Today, the tendon that connects the calf muscles to the heel bone is called the Achilles tendon

    My runner up was Jason, the leader of the Argonauts.

    I am happy to see that Marshmallow also enjoys Greek mythology.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. It is so interesting to see Marshmallow’s interest in Greek mythology. Maybe after she has exhausted all there is to know about Greek mythology, she might get interested in reading about Japanese mythology. The Kojiki, or “Record of Ancient Matters,” is the oldest surviving account of Japan’s myths, legends, and history. There are so many gods, goddesses and kami to read about. For example, the Goddess Amaterasu, she is the goddess of the sun as well as the purported ancestress of the Imperial Household of Japan. Her full name means “Great Goddess” or “Great Spirit Who Shines in the Heavens”. For many reasons, one among them being her ties to the Imperial family, she is often considered to be the “primary god” of Shinto.

    Here are 5 of the most popular ancient myths that maybe will whet Marshmallow’s appetite. https://takelessons.com/blog/japanese-mythology-z05

    Liked by 1 person

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