Marshmallow reviews Lucy and Andy Neanderthal: Stone Cold Age by Jeffrey Brown

Marshmallow reviews the second book in Jeffrey Brown’s Lucy and Andy Neanderthal series: Lucy and Andy Neanderthal: Stone Cold Age.

Last week Marshmallow reviewed They Called Us Enemy, written by the Star Trek veteran George Takei together with Justin Eisinger and Steven Scott, and illustrated by Harmony Becker. Today she wanted to review a more light-hearted graphic novel and she chose the second book of Jeffrey Brown’s Lucy & Andy Neanderthal series: Lucy and Andy Neanderthal: Stone Cold Age. For her review of the first book, Lucy and Andy Neanderthal, see here. (Caramel reviewed a book by Jeffrey Brown too; you might enjoy his review of My Teacher is a Robot.)

Marshmallow reviews Lucy and Andy Neanderthal: Stone Cold Age by Jeffrey Brown.
Marshmallow reviews Lucy and Andy Neanderthal: Stone Cold Age by Jeffrey Brown.

Marshmallow’s Overview:  If you like graphic novels and movies or books about the ice age, then this might be the book for you. You can enjoy it even if you have not read the first book (or my review of it).

Marshmallow’s Summary: Lucy and Andy Neanderthal are living in the Ice Age and now are friends with a clan of humans. Some of the Neanderthals like Lucy are best friends with some of the humans (Sasha), but her brother, Andy, is not enjoying the humans that are living in his cave with him. One human child, named Richard, especially annoys him by making fun of him. But he does make friends with a boy named Tommy who is scared of cave bears.

Lucy and Andy have fun with their new friends. They go to the beach and collect shells. They also face a cave bear. In the end, Sasha’s mom has a new child and so Sasha becomes an older sister.

Marshmallow is reading Lucy and Andy Neanderthal: Stone Cold Age by Jeffrey Brown.
Marshmallow is reading Lucy and Andy Neanderthal: Stone Cold Age by Jeffrey Brown.

Marshmallow’s Review: I enjoyed this book very much. Like the last book I reviewed this is a graphic novel. It has funny drawing and will make readers read it in one sitting. This book has excellent characters that are amusing, relatable, and interesting. It also has facts that intertwine fiction and nonfiction. 

“Fact and fiction cleverly collide in this prehistoric romp.

Shelf Awareness

The above quote describes this excellent book well. It is fun and entertaining to think about how humans and neanderthals must have interacted. The book is full of facts but is also completely hilarious. If you enjoyed the first book, you will certainly enjoy this one too.

I thoroughly enjoyed reading and rereading this terrific book about Neanderthals and the Ice Age. The author, Jeffrey Brown, draws hilarious drawings that describe that characters personalities. This is a very good book that can be read and reread over and over again.  I would recommend it to any and all bunnies who like books and want to laugh out loud while reading.

Marshmallow’s Rating: 100%.

Marshmallow rates Lucy and Andy Neanderthal: Stone Cold Age by Jeffrey Brown 100%.
Marshmallow rates Lucy and Andy Neanderthal: Stone Cold Age by Jeffrey Brown 100%.

Marshmallow reviews They Called Us Enemy by George Takei

Marshmallow enjoys graphic novels just like many other bunnies, but she has been especially taken by a 2019 book, the memoir They Called Us Enemy, written by the Star Trek veteran George Takei together with Justin Eisinger and Steven Scott, and illustrated by Harmony Becker. Below she shares her thoughts on this striking book.

Marshmallow reviews They Called Us Enemy, written by the Star Trek veteran George Takei together with Justin Eisinger and Steven Scott, and illustrated by Harmony Becker.
Marshmallow reviews They Called Us Enemy, written by the Star Trek veteran George Takei together with Justin Eisinger and Steven Scott, and illustrated by Harmony Becker.

Marshmallow’s Overview: In the book They Called Us Enemy, George Takei writes about what it was like to live in a Japanese internment camp. The internment camps were places where the USA put Japanese Americans and people who had come from Japan to find better opportunities in the USA during the second world war.

This was a dark time in American history that is not always emphasized. According to Wikipedia:

In 1988, President Ronald Reagan signed into law the Civil Liberties Act of 1988 which apologized for the internment on behalf of the U.S. government … The legislation admitted that government actions were based on “race prejudice, war hysteria, and a failure of political leadership.”

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Internment_of_Japanese_Americans

George Takei was put in an internment camp when he was a little boy. He stayed there for four years. The time that he spent in the camps was very important and affected his whole life. This book tells his story.

Marshmallow’s Summary: One day, George wakes up and he and his family are ordered to leave their home. As a reaction to the bombing of Pearl Harbor, the US government gathered most Japanese immigrants and Japanese Americans and put them in the camps because many Americans thought that they might betray the United States of America. George does not realize any of this because he is a little boy at the time that he is put in the camp.

George’s family has to board a train to get to the camp and they can only bring what they can carry and that is not much. To add on to that, the government makes them sell everything else that they own. 

When they get to the camp, they see that it is in the middle of nowhere and that they are surrounded by barbed wire and watch towers that have men with guns watching then. George and his family, which includes his brother, Henry, his sister, Nancy Reiko, his father, Takekuma Norman Takei, and his mother, Fumiko Emily Nakamura, have to sleep in a tiny house split by walls that are not sound-proof and their neighbors are able to hear everything that they say. So, in the end the parents decide that they will speak Japanese to each other when talking about private stuff.

They Called Us Enemy is a graphic novel with very realistic drawings. Marshmallow is pointing to the page where George’s parents are frustrated and outraged by the way they are treated.

When they come to the house it is very hot. The book compares it to a furnace. When they were in the camp, many people lose loved ones. For example, Mrs. Takahashi loses her husband because he is a Buddhist minister. She has four children. Those four children lose their father. Mr. Yasuda is taken by federal agents because he is teaching children how to speak Japanese.

“Their husbands’ only crimes were that they occupied highly visible positions…”

Not only are they being taken from their homes, but they are also losing family and friends.

Marshmallow’s Review: This was a very bad time for many people and this book shows how devastating it was. It is a very good book that captures the essence of how important this event is in American history. The internment of Japanese Americans was a big event especially for people who suffered though it and lost members of their family and friends. It is also important for us today. We need to know our past so we don’t make similar mistakes in the future.

Marshmallow’s Rating: 100%.

Marshmallow rates They Called Us Enemy, by George Takei, written together with Justin Eisinger and Steven Scott, and illustrated by Harmony Becker, 100%.
Marshmallow rates They Called Us Enemy, by George Takei, written together with Justin Eisinger and Steven Scott, and illustrated by Harmony Becker, 100%.

Caramel reviews The Hidden Kingdom (Book Three of Wings of Fire) by Tui Sutherland and Mike Holmes

Caramel reviews the graphic novel version of The Hidden Kingdom (Book Three of Wings of Fire) by Tui Sutherland (with art work by Mike Holmes).

Caramel has already reviewed the graphic novel versions of the first two books of Tui Sutherland’s Wings of Fire series. (See Caramel’s review of The Dragonet Prophesy here; his review of The Lost Heir is here.) Today he reviews the third book in the series that appeared as a graphic novel: The Hidden Kingdom (adapted by Barry Deutsch and Rachel Swirsky, art work by Mike Holmes, color by Maarta Laiho). As usual, Sprinkles is taking notes and asking questions as needed.

Caramel reviews The Hidden Kingdom (Book Three of Wings of Fire) by Tui Sutherland and Mike Holmes.
Caramel reviews The Hidden Kingdom (Book Three of Wings of Fire) by Tui Sutherland and Mike Holmes.

Sprinkles: So this is the third book of the series you have read, right, Caramel?

Caramel: Yes. But I am not done. I’m still keeping busy flipping through the pages.

S: But you have read it at least once all the way, right?

C: Yes, I have. But I like reading these books over and over again.

S: Why is that?

C: I think these Wings of Fire books are really awesome. I love the pictures, the books are really very colorful.

Caramel enjoys reading and also looking at the pictures of The Hidden Kingdom, (Book Three of Wings of Fire) by Tui Sutherland and Mike Holmes.
Caramel enjoys reading and also looking at the pictures of The Hidden Kingdom, (Book Three of Wings of Fire) by Tui Sutherland and Mike Holmes.

S: What about the story? What is happening in this third book?

C: All of the books are about the five dragons we met in the first book. But of course there are always some new characters.

S: Tell me more. Who is the central character of this book?

C: Glory. She is a RainWing. They are supposed to be lazy and almost stupid, but Glory is smart. RainWings have venom, and can camouflage. They can also turn invisible.

S: So what is happening to Glory in this book? Is she also destined to be the queen of her tribe, like Tsunami from the second book?

C: She is.

S: So is trouble awaiting her when she comes home, like it did Tsunami?

C: Yes and no. Not quite trouble but there are some challenges she has to face.

S: Like what?

C: She has to find a specific flower in a flower hunt. They go through these challenges in teams.

S: So does Glory also make some good friends along the way?

C: Yes. Glory makes at least two good friends. One of them is Kinkajou, who is at some point in this book kidnapped, but they eventually find her. And another new friend is Mangrove. He is grumpy at first because his partner is missing.

S: So some RainWings are going missing. And Glory and her friends try to find them, right?

C: No, Glory has to do it alone. And she has another friend, too. I forgot. Her name is Tamarin. She is blind, but she wins the flower hunt. She has a very good sense of smell.

S: These books seem like a lot is going on in each of them. Lots of action, lots of mystery, right?

C: Yup. Do you want me to tell you who is kidnapping the RainWings?

S: No! We should not spoil it for our readers!

C: Well, ok. Then I guess we can just wrap things up. Stay tuned for more book bunnies adventures!

Caramel is still reading and rereading The Hidden Kingdom (Book Three of Wings of Fire) by Tui Sutherland and Mike Holmes.
Caramel is still reading and rereading The Hidden Kingdom (Book Three of Wings of Fire) by Tui Sutherland and Mike Holmes.

Caramel reviews The Lost Heir (Book Two of Wings of Fire) by Tui Sutherland and Mike Holmes

Caramel reviews the graphic novel version of The Lost Heir (Book Two of Wings of Fire) by Tui Sutherland (with art work by Mike Holmes).

Last week Caramel reviewed the graphic novel version of The Dragonet Prophesy (Book One of Wings of Fire) by Tui Sutherland (adapted by Barry Deutsch, art work by Mike Holmes, color by Maarta Laiho). This week he wanted to talk about the second graphic novel in the series: The Lost Heir. As always Sprinkles is taking notes and asking followup questions.

Caramel reviews the graphic novel version of The Lost Heir (Book Two of Wings of Fire) by Tui Sutherland (with art work by Mike Holmes).
Caramel reviews the graphic novel version of The Lost Heir (Book Two of Wings of Fire) by Tui Sutherland (with art work by Mike Holmes).

Sprinkles: So how do you want to start this review Caramel?

Caramel: This book is good if you like graphic novels and if you like dragons, too. All of the Wings of Fire series is great for bunnies who like dragons.

S: I can see that! You haven’t dropped this book since you picked it up. Can you tell me a bit about what happens in this book?

C: Let me see. First let me tell you the characters.

S: Aren’t they the same characters as in the first book?

C: Yes, many are the same, but there are some new ones. I think there are four new characters actually.

S: But in your first review you did not really tell us much about the characters. We only heard about Oasis, Blaze, Burn, and Blister. And the five types of dragons: SandWings, MudWings, SeaWings, NightWings, and RainWings. So you can tell us about the characters a bit this time. For example do you have a favorite character?

C: Riptide is probably my favorite of the new characters. He is the nicest. He is a SeaWing. SeaWing dragons can see in the dark and breathe under water. And some of their scales can glow in the dark. But we learned all that in the first book.

Caramel has been reading and rereading the graphic novel version of The Lost Heir (Book Two of Wings of Fire) by Tui Sutherland (with art work by Mike Holmes).
Caramel has been reading and rereading the graphic novel version of The Lost Heir (Book Two of Wings of Fire) by Tui Sutherland (with art work by Mike Holmes).

S: So what happens in this second book?

C: Tsunami is a SeaWing dragon who returns home. She’s apparently a lost princess.

S: How does Riptide come into the picture?

C: They are in the same tribe. And he is one of the patrol guards. He and Tsunami become friends.

S: So the back of the book says:

Tsunami can’t believe that she’s finally returning to the SeaWing Kingdom after spending her life under a mountain. She’s desperate to feel the water on her scales and to be reunited with her mother, Queen Coral. The queen welcomes her long-lost daughter with open wings, but a vicious assassin has been killing the heirs to the throne and Tsunami may be next.

S: This sounds scary!

C: Yeah. But don’t worry Sprinkles, things do work out alright in the end. She survives.

S: Ooo, we should not give away too much Caramel.

C: Aw, but I wanted to tell you all about it. The whole entire book!

S: Maybe after we are done with the review… For now let us think about what more to say that won’t give away too much.

C: Alright. Can I rate the book at the end? Like Marshmallow does?

S: Sure. Why not?

C: Yay! My rating for this book would be 100%.

S: Wow! So you like it so much that you think it is almost perfect!

C: It is perfect! In fact it’s more than perfect. Awesome super duper perfect!

S: Why though? Why do you like it so much?

C: I love dragons. And I like the characters, and the story. It’s awesome! And now I can say the last words!

S: Yes, Caramel. Go for it!

C: Stay tuned for more book bunnies adventures!

Caramel rates the graphic novel version of The Lost Heir (Book Two of Wings of Fire) by Tui Sutherland (with art work by Mike Holmes) 100%.
Caramel rates the graphic novel version of The Lost Heir (Book Two of Wings of Fire) by Tui Sutherland (with art work by Mike Holmes) 100%.