Caramel reviews The Dragonet Prophesy (Book One of Wings of Fire) by Tui Sutherland and Mike Holmes

Caramel reviews the graphic novel version of The Dragonet Prophesy (Book One of Wings of Fire) by Tui Sutherland (with art work by Mike Holmes).

Caramel has been eager to get his paws on this book series for ages! Today he reviews the graphic novel version of the first book of the Wings of Fire series by Tui Sutherland (adapted by Barry Deutsch, art work by Mike Holmes, color by Maarta Laiho). As usual, Sprinkles is taking notes and asking questions as needed.

Caramel reviews The Dragonet Prophesy (Book One of Wings of Fire) by Tui Sutherland and Mike Holmes.
Caramel reviews The Dragonet Prophesy (Book One of Wings of Fire) by Tui Sutherland and Mike Holmes.

Sprinkles: How do you want to start this review Caramel?

Caramel: If you are a person who likes dragons and graphic novels, this series might be good for you.

S: You must be channeling Marshmallow! That’s usually how she starts her reviews!

C: Good point! Maybe I should also start rating books!

S: We can think about that later. So what else do you want to tell us about this book?

C: Can I share a quote? Or a page?

S: Let’s stick with a quote. A whole page might be too much.

C: Hmm. Ok, maybe later. There is a Queen dragon named Oasis who gets killed, and then her daughters, three dragon princesses, Burn, Blaze, and Blister, are fighting for her throne.

S: Those names sound kind of scary. Do they all breathe fire?

C: No. I don’t think so. Oh, or maybe they can. I don’t know really.

S: And there is a prophesy, right? What is that about?

C: It’s about these five dragons who will stop the war and choose the next queen of the SandWings.

S: So Oasis is a SandWing. What other kinds of dragons are there in this world?

C: There are MudWings, SeaWings, NightWings, and RainWings. Apparently the NightWings were supposed to tell the future and read minds, but the NightWing dragonet Starflight cannot do any of that.

S: But still these five will somehow save the world, or stop the war, or something, right?

C: Right something like that.

S: So is a dragonet a baby dragon?

C: I think so.

S: So this sounds like a complicated storyline. Are there any humans on this world?

C: Yes, only a few, and they are not very good. They killed Oasis. The dragons call them Scavengers.

S: So the whole story is told from the viewpoint of the dragons, rights?

C: Or rather, the dragonets!

S: What do you think of the illustrations? This book is very orange.

C: The cover is but the inside is not! It is colorful though. And the drawings are really good.

Caramel is enjoying his first real graphic novel: The Dragonet Prophesy (Book One of Wings of Fire) by Tui Sutherland and Mike Holmes.
Caramel is enjoying his first real graphic novel: The Dragonet Prophesy (Book One of Wings of Fire) by Tui Sutherland and Mike Holmes.

S: According to Common Sense Media, this book is a bit too violent for some kids. What did you think?

C: Yeah, there were some parts I wanted to skip. And I did. So I think it is true that it has some violent parts. There are some deaths for example.

S: But also the review above is of the actual book, not the graphic novel version. So there may be some differences. Did you read the original book?

C: Nope.

S: Did you even know there was another version?

C: I did.

S: I think the graphic novels are newer and they are coming out one by one, but there are a lot more of the series that are in regular book format. Do you think you will want to read those too?

C: Nope, not really.

S: Really? I think the other books might also be interesting. Maybe once you are done with the graphic novels, you will want to know what happens next and you will end up wanting to read the other ones too. There are only two graphic novels so far and the series has over fifteen books

C: We will see. Maybe Marshmallow will read them first.

S: That might be a good idea. They might be for older bunnies… But so far so good, right? You seem to love this book, you are almost inseparable from it!

C: Yes! But now it’s time for me to say: Stay tuned for more book bunnies adventures!

Caramel really enjoyed reading The Dragonet Prophesy (Book One of Wings of Fire) by Tui Sutherland and Mike Holmes.
Caramel really enjoyed reading The Dragonet Prophesy (Book One of Wings of Fire) by Tui Sutherland and Mike Holmes.

Marshmallow reviews Beezus and Ramona by Beverly Cleary

Marshmallow reviews Beezus and Ramona by Beverly Cleary.

Through the years, Marshmallow has enjoyed reading several books by Beverly Cleary, the prolific writer of children’s books. Below she writes about Beezus and Ramona, the first book of Cleary featuring Ramona Quimby written in 1955.

Marshmallow reviews Beezus and Ramona by Beverly Cleary.
Marshmallow reviews Beezus and Ramona by Beverly Cleary.

Marshmallow’s quick take: If you like books that are about siblings or have enjoyed reading some of Beverly Cleary’s other books before, then this book might be for you.

Marshmallow’s Summary (with spoilers): Beezus (or Beatrice really, but everyone calls her Beezus) and Ramona Quimby are two sisters who are sometimes nice to each other and sometimes not. Four-year-old Ramona annoys her big sister Beezus a lot. For example when Beezus’s friend comes over, Ramona knocks their checker game over. Then she sticks her doll into Beezus’s birthday cake while pretending to be Gretel. After Ramona writes her name on every page on a library book that Beezus checked out for Ramona, Beezus is really very annoyed. As you can see Ramona is not a very nice little sibling.

Marshmallow is pointing at the page where we see some of Ramona's scribbles.
Marshmallow is pointing at the page where we see some of Ramona’s scribbles.

Ramona is a very realistic annoying sibling. For example, when she finds a lot of apples in the basement, she takes one bite out of each apple and then starts another one. The Quimby family has some exciting times, like when Ramona invites her whole nursery school class to a party without asking her parents if she could.

The author, Beverly Cleary, wrote this book as part as a series featuring Ramona, Beezus, and her friends. In fact Ramona did not come to be a central character till about ten years later when she wrote Ramona the Pest, in 1968.

Marshmallow’s review: I thoroughly enjoyed this book. It is an old book, published even before my parents were born, but it is still a good read for readers who like books about sibling problems.

Beezus and Ramona is a classic like some other books that I have reviewed earlier, such as Half Magic and Five Children and It. It is also very funny and will make a lot of people laugh, like when Ramona powders her nose with marshmallows she calls “powder puffs”.

This is the first of a series of books by Beverly Cleary featuring Ramona Quimby. It is also one of my favorite books from the author. Ramona is very funny in this book. Some of my other favorite books by Beverly Cleary include Ramona the Pest, Ramona the Brave, The Mouse and the Motorcycle, Henry and Ribsy, Ellen Tebbits, Henry and Beezus, and Ramona’s World. I like these books because they are funny, well written, and realistic.

The drawings in the book add to the story’s description.

One thing I really enjoy about Beverly Cleary’s books is that they end well. In Beezus and Ramona the story ends… well I don’t want to spoil the end but let’s just say it ends well.

Marshmallow’s rating: 95%.

Marshmallow rates Beezus and Ramona by Beverly Cleary 95%.
Marshmallow rates Beezus and Ramona by Beverly Cleary 95%.

Caramel reviews Penguins Hate Stuff by Greg Stones

Caramel reviews Penguins Hate Stuff by Greg Stones.

Caramel was digging through the book bunnies’ family library when he discovered a little book by Greg Stones titled Penguins Hate Stuff. Though it is not really a children’s book, Penguins Hate Stuff did make Caramel chuckle for a long while. So below he shares his thoughts on this little book about some very opinionated penguins. Sprinkles is taking notes and asking questions, as usual.

Caramel reviews Penguins Hate Stuff by Greg Stones.
Caramel reviews Penguins Hate Stuff by Greg Stones.

Sprinkles: So Caramel, I can see you really like this book!

Caramel: I really do. But I’m busy now, flipping through the pages.

S: Alright, you can do that too, but also tell us a bit about this book. What is it about?

C: It’s about pigeons. Oops! I mean penguins.

S: For a moment there you got this book confused with the adventures of the Pigeon, no?

C: Yes, I reviewed a book about the Pigeon, the one where he doesn’t want to go to school. But this is not about pigeons, it’s about penguins. And according to this book penguins really like pigeons.

S: So the book is about what penguins like and what they hate, right? So tell me a few things they hate.

C: Apparently they hate samurai, which we actually like. I even reviewed a book about them.

Caramel is pointing at the pages of Penguins Hate Stuff where we learn that penguins hate samurai and bullfighting.
Caramel is pointing at the pages of Penguins Hate Stuff where we learn that penguins hate samurai and bullfighting.

C: But I would hate sky sharks too.

S: Wait a minute. What is a sky shark?

C: It’s a shark that swims in the sky.

S: So it’s make-believe, right?

C: Yup.

S: And there are many other make-believe things in the book, right? Zombies, leprechauns…

C: Yes, and witches…

S: What do you think about the illustrations?

C: I think they are pretty good. They also apparently hate oil rigs. So a penguin put an explosive on one.

S: That kind of sounds pretty destructive.

C: Yes.

S: The book is not always really very gentle. It is not really for little bunnies like you Caramel. But you found it hilarious, right?

C: Yep. The penguins look tiny and very serious sometimes.

S: Which one is your favorite? Tell me a few of your favorite pages.

C: I would say, not the oil rigs, not the samurai, I like the page where the penguins really like balloons. They also like capes. I like that!

S: Yes, the penguin wearing the cape is flying, and penguins don’t usually fly, right?

C: Yes, penguins can’t fly. So the cape must be magical and making it fly. I also like the page where “penguins like bum warmers.”

S: What does that mean Caramel?

C: They are sitting on sheep and their bums get warm that way.

S: I thought those were polar bears!

C: They are sheep!

S: Alright, I’ll take your word for it. Your eyes see much better than mine. And all of these pages have very detailed pictures and you like looking at all the details on each page, don’t you?

C: Yes, I do. And this is a good time to wrap this up so I can continue to flip through the pages.

S: Sounds good. Why don’t you say the last word?

C: Stay tuned for more book bunny adventures!

Caramel loves turning the pages of Penguins Hate Stuff by Greg Stones and rediscovering yet another ridiculous thing penguins hate!
Caramel loves turning the pages of Penguins Hate Stuff by Greg Stones and rediscovering yet another ridiculous thing penguins hate!

Marshmallow reviews Five Children and It by E. Nesbit

Marshmallow reviews Five Children and It, a novel by Edith Nesbit first published in 1902.

Marshmallow wanted to talk about E. Nesbit’s book Five Children and It today. Sprinkles is asking questions and taking notes.

Marshmallow reviews Five Children and It by E. Nesbit.
Marshmallow reviews Five Children and It by E. Nesbit.

Sprinkles: So Marshmallow can you tell us a bit about this book?

Marshmallow: Cyril, Anthea, Robert, Jane, and Lamb the baby dig a hole to reach Australia. While they are digging, they find a strange creature called Psammead (a sand-fairy) that can grant wishes. At the beginning, the children wish to be as beautiful as the day and to have a lot of gold but then they realize that they must be more careful when they are making wishes. Whenever they make a wish, they always end up in trouble.

S: Oh, does this book remind you of another?

M: It’s kind of similar to Half Magic by Edward Eager. Just like in that book, the children find this object or fairy that grants them wishes and they eventually find that they need to think carefully about what they will wish for.

S: So what more can you tell us?

M: This is an interesting book that will beg the question, “If you could wish for anything. what would you wish for?”

I thoroughly enjoyed reading it because it was interesting how when the children wished for something like to be beautiful or when they wished to have wings, there was a problem. For example, when they wished to be “as beautiful as the day” after they tried to interact with their baby brother Lamb (whose real and full name is Hilary St. Maul Devereux). They then change and Lamb does not recognize them because they look different. Also when they try to go to their house their nursemaid does not let them in because they look different and not like their old selves. They get very hungry and thirsty and they realize that it was not a great idea to have wished to be “as beautiful as the day.”

S: What more do you want to say?

M: This is a very entertaining book, and very well written. It will make you want to read on to learn what wish the children make next.

S: Yes, they do make some strange wishes, don’t they? What did you think of the illustrations?

M: I thought the pictures were very successful.

Marshmallow is pointing out one of the many illustrations in Five Children and It by E. Nesbit.
Marshmallow is pointing out one of the many illustrations in Five Children and It by E. Nesbit.

S: And you have some thoughts on the characters?

M: Yes! Especially I liked the fact that the children act like children. Kind of like in the Ivy + Bean books!

S: This is a very old book. It could be the oldest book you have read. What do you think of that?

M: It is an old book. It does have some stereotypes, like girls always cry, and boys never do. But overall it is a good book.

S: Ok, so what would you have wished for if you had met Psammead?

M: I don’t know. What would you wish for?

S: I don’t know, either. It is a hard question, without all the challenges this particular sand-fairy brings. Maybe I’d wish for some good meal, or a good night’s sleep. Something simple like that… Or I could wish for a good book to read. This was one, you say?

M: Yes! I’d rate it 95%. And I really want to add this last sentence: Stay tuned for more book bunnies reviews!

Marshmallow rates Five Children and It by E. Nesbit 95%.
Marshmallow rates Five Children and It by E. Nesbit 95%.